This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

From “Ken Burn’s Vietnam War” – Marines marching in Danang, Vietnam, March 15, 1965. AP / PBS.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the ongoing war over the Vietnam War to declassifying apartheid profits, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

The Centre’s Fall Term 2017 Seminar Schedule

We have a great lineup this term for the Centre for Imperial & Global History’s weekly seminar series. Mark your calendars!

Kicking things off this afternoon is Professor Martin Thomas on ‘Between Dien Bien Phu and Geneva: How the Vietminh lost the war they won’.

Should you have any queries, please contact the seminar coordinator, Dr. Emily Bridger.

Date

Event

27 September
Week 1
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Welcome Event

Martin Thomas (Exeter), ‘Between Dien Bien Phu and Geneva: How the Vietminh lost the war they won’

11 October
Week 3
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Linda Bryder (University of Auckland), ‘The mobilisation of mothers: 1917 National Baby Week’

25 October
Week 5
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Rachel Pistol (Exeter), ‘Second World War Internment and its Aftermath – Comparing Internee Experiences in the UK and the USA’

8 November
Week 7
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Ollie Owen (Oxford), ‘Burma Boys in war and peace: Transformational experiences of Nigerian soldiers in World War II’

22 November
Week 9
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Ghee Bowman (Exeter), ‘“No Pakis at Dunkirk”: Force K6 of the Indian Army in Europe, 1939-1945’

6 December
Week 11
Amory B316
4:30-6pm

Miguel Hernandez (Exeter), ‘“The Menace of Modern Immigration”: Nativism and the Ku Klux Klan in 1920s America’

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

The ugliness of colonial power in India emerged at its end with the Bengal Famine and the Partition. Wikimedia Commons

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the brutality of colonialism to how studying the Vietnam War has changed, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

View of the Cairo suburb of Helwan at the end of the nineteenth century. From the Library of Congress.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From America’s Cold War delusions to indigenous London, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

World War II internment camps still have much to teach us


US newspaper headlines of the forced relocation of over 110,000 individuals of Japanese ancestry.

Rachel Pistol
University of Exeter

Read any newspaper in the United States or United Kingdom at the moment and it is likely to be full of news items related to refugees and immigration. Were you to open a newspaper in the 1930s, you would find very similar news stories. Despite the fact Second World War internment took place over 70 years ago, it could not be more relevant in today’s society.

Internment is a recognised function of war, and so the detention of enemy aliens during the Second World War was not unexpected. In times of peril, it can be hard to discern who is friend and who is foe, and there are inevitably casualties of war.

However, national security as a reason for action can sometimes be abused.

Such was the case with the mass internment of those of Japanese ancestry in the United States, a large proportion of whom were American citizens, supposedly protected by the constitution. There were multiple deaths in camp due to the poor medical facilities, notwithstanding the trigger happy guards – the most famous of these deaths perhaps being that of James Hatsuki Wakasa in 1943.

In the case of internment in Britain, the most readily identifiable victims were those who drowned when the Arandora Star, a ship transporting internees from the Isle of Man to Canada, was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat, in 1940.

It should be a sign of a society’s humanity as to how marginalised peoples are treated, particularly when the only ‘crime’ of an individual is his or her race, religion, or nationality. Continue reading “World War II internment camps still have much to teach us”

Call for Applications: Global Humanitarianism Research Academy 2018

GHRA2018.png

Call for Applications:

Global Humanitarianism Research Academy 2018

International Research Academy on the History of Global Humanitarianism

Academy Leaders:   

Fabian Klose (Leibniz Institute of European History Mainz)

Johannes Paulmann (Leibniz Institute of European History Mainz)

Andrew Thompson (University of Exeter)

in co-operation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (Geneva)

and with support by the German Historical Institute London

Venues:  University of Exeter & Archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva

Dates:               9-20 July 2018

Deadline:        31 December 2017

Information at: http://ghra.ieg-mainz.de/, http://hhr.hypotheses.org/ and https://imperialglobalexeter.com/

The international Global Humanitarianism | Research Academy (GHRA) offers research training to PhD candidates and early postdocs. It combines academic sessions at the Imperial and Global History Centre at the University of Exeter and the Leibniz Institute of European History in Mainz with archival sessions at the Archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva. The Research Academy is for early career researchers who are working in the related fields of humanitarianism, international humanitarian law, peace and conflict studies as well as human rights covering the period from the 18th to the 20th century. It supports scholarship on the ideas and practices of humanitarianism in the context of international, imperial and global history thus advancing our understanding of global governance in humanitarian crises of the present. Continue reading “Call for Applications: Global Humanitarianism Research Academy 2018”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From decolonization without independence to the imperialism of country music, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”