Job Klaxon: Lecturer in Modern History

Lecturer (E&S) in Modern History

Job details

Job reference S63958

Date posted 20/09/2021

Application closing date 04/10/2021

Location Exeter

Salary The starting salary will be from £36,382 up to £47,419 on Grade (F), depending on qualifications and experience.

Package Generous holiday allowances, flexible working, pension scheme and relocation package (if applicable).

This full time role is available immediately on a fixed-term contract until August 2022.  The successful applicant must be able to start no later than 1 November 2021.

The University of Exeter is a Russell Group university in the top 200 universities worldwide. We combine world-class teaching with world-class research, and have achieved a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework Award 2017. We have over 22,000 students and 4600 staff from 180 different countries and have been rated the WhatUni2017 International Student Choice. Our research focuses on some of the most fundamental issues facing humankind today, with 98% of our research rated as being of international quality in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. We encourage proactive engagement with industry, business and community partners to enhance the impact of research and education and improve the employability of our students.

The role

The role of Lecturer in Modern History (Education and Scholarship) in the Department of History will include supporting the student learning experience using a range of approaches and modes of delivery appropriate to the teaching allocated. The post-holder will support the design and delivery of innovative and high-quality teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The ability to teach introductory, first-year modules on US history (post-1850) is desirable.

For further details and to apply click here

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Thomas Sankara, president of Burkina Faso, with French president François Mitterrand. Ouagadougou. November 1986. Daniel Janin/AFP/Getty Images.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From 9/11’s lost news coverage to France’s brutal post-colonial legacy in West Africa, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

British soldiers in tanks pass an Afghan guard post in 1941. Hanns Tschira/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

A special Afghanistan edition of this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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Post: Lecturer in Modern American History

College: College of Humanities

Reference No: R63958

Date posted 19/08/2021

Application closing date 02/09/2021

Location Exeter

Grade: F

Salary The starting salary will be from £36,382 on Grade F, depending on qualifications and experience.

Package Generous holiday allowances, flexible working, pension scheme and relocation package (if applicable).

This full time role is available immediately on a fixed term contract until August 2022.

The role

The role of Lecturer in Modern American History (Education and Scholarship) in the Department of History will include supporting the student learning experience using a range of approaches and modes of delivery appropriate to the teaching allocated. The post-holder will support the design and delivery of innovative and high-quality blended teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. Expertise in American History (post-1850) and the history of the civil rights movement is essential.  

About you

You will:

  • Possess sufficient breadth or depth of specialist and core knowledge in the discipline, demonstrated by a PhD or equivalent in Modern American History to develop teaching programmes, and teach and support learning
  • Use a range of delivery techniques to enthuse and engage students
  • Participate in and develop external networks, for example, to contribute to student recruitment, secure student placements, facilitate outreach work, generate income, obtain consultancy projects, or build relationships for future activities
  • Have evidence of excellent teaching identified by peer review and have made an impact at discipline level
  • Be expected to work towards Fellow of the HEA status

Please ensure you read our Job Description and Person Specification for full details of this role.

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Political Proteus: Nationalism’s Entangled Histories (26-27 August)

The Pierre du Bois Annual Conference, organised by the Graduate Institute in partnership with the Pierre du Bois Foundation and with support from the Swiss National Science Foundation, will take place at Maison de la paix.

Michael Goebel, Professor of International History and Politics and Pierre du Bois Chair Europe and the World, is organising the Conference. 

keynote lecture titled “Being in Time: The Experience of Nationhood” will be given by Bernard Yack, the Lerman Neubauer Professor of Democracy and Public Policy at Brandeis University.

The background note can be found here and the biographies of participants here.

Registration: Click here to register for events.

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From how Latin America reimagined classical political economy to asking who is responsible for Afghanistan’s tragedy, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

The forgotten Australian veterans who opposed National Service and the Vietnam War

Jon Piccini
Australian Catholic University

On July 26 1971, a top secret cabinet meeting ended what was then Australia’s longest conflict. The public would hear about it for the first time in August, when Prime Minister William McMahon announced the withdrawal of Australian forces from Vietnam.

Eighteen months — and a change of government later — Australia’s Vietnam War was over. Alongside untold Vietnamese, some 521 Australians had died in conflict, including 202 national servicemen.

The end of Australia’s war also saw the wrapping up of a novel and now largely forgotten organisation. The Ex-Services Human Rights Association of Australia was founded in October 1966 by former servicemen and women who “oppose militarism” and “believe that National Service […] should not involve conscription for foreign wars”.

The final issue of the group’s newsletter, Conscience, in February 1972 paid special tribute to Martin Leslie (Les) Waddington, a World War II veteran and leather goods manufacturer, and the group’s “spiritual leader, and greatest workhorse”.

Fifty years since Australia officially began withdrawing from Vietnam, my forthcoming article reflects on how Waddington exemplified an undercurrent of anti-war citizen soldiery in Australia.

Continue reading “The forgotten Australian veterans who opposed National Service and the Vietnam War”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Team USA congratulating Russian Olympic Committee for winning the gold medal in women’s gymnastics, Tokyo, Japan, July 27, 2021. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From how centuries of US imperialism made surfing an Olympic sport to why it’s not surprising that Simone Biles cheered for Angelina Melnikova, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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Addressing the Contemporary Climate Crisis by Decolonizing Environmental History

Dakota Access Pipeline Protest 

Lori Lee Oates (@drlorileeoates)
Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador

In 2019, I had the opportunity to participate in public scholarship collaborations with political scientists, geographers, and community activists on the climate crisis. This led to lecturing to graduate students on the climate emergency and writing guest essays on the topic for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The criticism from climate change deniers was swift and fierce but not unexpected. It was usually some variation of “What does a humanities scholar or historian know about climate change?” or “These are issues best left to business schools and engineering departments.” The response forced me to grapple with the question: what is the role of global and imperial history in providing commentary on the climate crisis?

The question hits particularly close to home for me; Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador, where I teach in the Master of Philosophy (Humanities) program, is located in one of Canada’s petro provinces. The economy has always been heavily dependent on natural resource sectors and very much dependent on oil since 1997. The one economic golden age the province experienced was fostered by high oil prices. The province has also had a troubled imperial history as it went from being the home of the lost Indigenous people known as the Beothuk, to becoming European fishing grounds, used by imperial powers for its vast natural resources, then to a British colony, to Commonwealth dominion, back to commission of government, all before joining Canada as its tenth province in 1949.

The legacy of imperialism on Newfoundland’s resource-dependent economy was explored back in the mid ‘90s by Valerie Summers in Regime Change in a Resource Economy: The Politics of Underdevelopment in Newfoundland since 1825 (1994). In the intervening decades, Newfoundland and Labrador’s approach to economic development continues to be rooted in imperial ways of thinking, which arguably prevent its development as the global economy has moved away from localized natural resources sectors, and towards globalized service sectors. Political economists have effectively documented the phenomenon known as “the resource curse”. Overdependence on natural resources, or a single resource, are problems that afflict many former colonies, that have historically been used as a source for the extraction for their resources. This overdependence, then, is an imperial legacy.

Continue reading “Addressing the Contemporary Climate Crisis by Decolonizing Environmental History”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Sergio Leone’s The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, a classic example of dubbed post-war European film. Italian movie poster.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the nationalist politics of film dubbing to the Summer of Soul, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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How Has the Pandemic Reshaped U.S. Foreign Relations Histories?

Anne L. Foster (Indiana State University) and Petra Goedde (Temple University)
Editors, Diplomatic History

Covid-19 has laid bare the tension between globalism and nationalism, the promise and limits of modern medicine, the persistence of inequality, legacies of imperialism and racism.  We have witnessed human beings adapt with remarkable resilience, but also the toll the took on families and individuals beyond the threat of death and disease: isolation, job loss, financial insecurity, uncertainty.

As university teachers and mothers, we scrambled in the spring of 2020 to adjust our living and teaching.  As foreign relations scholars and journal editors we were thinking about what all this meant for our work.  And so we invited a group of scholars to reflect on this question: What has living through this pandemic revealed or changed about your conception of your scholarship? 

We are happy to announce that the twenty-three short essays they wrote have just been published in the June 2021 issue of Diplomatic History, all of which are currently free to read and download online.

Continue reading “How Has the Pandemic Reshaped U.S. Foreign Relations Histories?”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the long history of US-Haitian relations to Japan’s Indian connection, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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German Colonialism, Suppressed Memories: A CIGH Interview with Jürgen Zimmerer

Professor Jürgen Zimmerer

Professor Richard Toye (@RichardToye) of the Centre for Imperial and Global History interviews Professor Jürgen Zimmerer (@juergenzimmerer) of the University of Hamburg on the theme of contested German colonial history.

RT: You recently gave a fascinating interview on the theme of repressed/suppressed memories of German colonialism. One point you made is that because Germany had had its colonies taken away after World War I, it did not go through the same post-1945 decolonization process as other European countries; rather at that point it had to deal with the legacy of the Nazi era. But in spite of that – looking at the reactions to your interview on Twitter – it seems that in terms of current debates the UK and Germany, at least, have certain things in common. When you draw attention to German colonial crimes, some Germans say, in effect, “But why do you insist on dragging this up? After all, other empires were much worse than ours.” Something similar happens in Britain – usually people suggest that the French or the Belgians were worse than we were. Why do you think this “whataboutery” or “whataboutism” is so prevalent?

JZ: Your observation is correct. My references to the first decades after World War II were meant to explain why what I call “colonial amnesia” could take place. By that I mean the marginalisation or nostalgic idealization of German colonialism in public perception. For the post-war generation the “colonial” question was a British or French one, etc. not a German one. On the one hand, Germany had “lost” its formal colonies already in 1919 and, on the other hand, after 1945 the memory of World War II and the Third Reich took centre stage. Interestingly, what was discussed was neither the Holocaust, which became a matter of broad debate only in the 1980s, nor the German war crimes in the war of annihilation, which led to huge debates in the 1990s, but rather German suffering from the war and German resistance to Hitler.

Already at that time you could find references to the colonial crimes of others, particularly of the victorious powers, what you so poignantly called whataboutery. It was meant to deflect from German guilt and was used as an argument that the enforced De-Nazification was unjust, and that only Germans were being forced to undergo such a humiliating experience. Later on the argument was slightly modified. Now it read: We take responsibility for the Holocaust, and this is enough. We don’t engage with colonialism, like the German genocide of the Herero and Nama people, because we already deal with the Holocaust, and now the others should deal with colonialism first. Now Germany was the role model of coming to terms with the past, attempting to gain the moral high ground.

RT: This is very interesting. In the UK, perhaps it is the other way round. “We stood alone against Hitler in 1940; this is our trump card against all criticism.” However, there is some acknowledgement that some aspects of the British Empire were at least mildly problematic. People argue, however, that taking everything in the round these aspects were eclipsed by benefits, most usually the railways … In Germany, do people try to do the same thing, in other words to claim that although there were some downsides, the German Empire was beneficial to the colonised?

Continue reading “German Colonialism, Suppressed Memories: A CIGH Interview with Jürgen Zimmerer”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Souvenir portraits of Xi Jinping and Mao Zedong in Beijing, China. Photograph: Roman Pilipey/EPA

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From replacing Canada Day to the origins of ‘geopolitics’, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Curry Coolie. Image source: Bridgeman Images.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From renaming Mt Everest to curry tales of the empire, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”