Interview with Prof. Astrid Rasch – ‘Bordering on Brexit: Global Britain and the Embers of Empire’ Conference

The ‘Bordering on Brexit: Global Britain and the Embers of Empire‘ Conference was held last weekend at Garrison Library, Gibraltar. Professor Richard Toye, Director of Exeter’s Centre for Imperial and Global History, interviews Prof. Astrid Rasch (NTNU) about the conference and the ‘Embers of Empire’ project.

Autumn Term CIGH seminar schedule

The Autumn Term is now upon us, and so please find the Centre for Imperial and Global History seminar schedule below for your calendars.

Please direct any inquiries about attending to the seminar convenor, Dr. Emily Bridger.

 
Date and Location
Speaker
Paper Title
26 September (Week 1)
Amory B315, 4:30-6pm
Katie Natanel
(Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies)
‘Unruly Affects: Tracing Love and Melancholia in Israeli Settler Colonialism’
10 October (Week 3)
Amory B315,
4:30-6pm
Amanda Nettleback
(University College Dublin)
‘Colonial Violence and the Limits of the Law’
24 October (Week 5)
Amory B315,
4:30-6pm
Sonia Wigh
(University of Exeter)
‘Sex, Secrets, and Savant: Exploring Sexualities in Early Modern South Asia (1650-1750)’
7 November (Week 7)
Amory B315,
4:30-6pm
Ljubica Spaskovska
(University of Exeter)
‘Constructing the “City of International Solidarity”: Non-aligned Internationalism, the United Nations and Visions of Development, Modernism and Solidarity, 1955-1975’
14 November (Week 8)
Amory B315,
4:30-6pm
Gabriel Gorodetsky
(All Souls College, Oxford)
The Myth of the Grand Alliance in World War II
21 November (Week 9)
Amory B315,
4:30-6pm
Michael Goebel
(Graduate Institute Geneva)
‘Patchwork Cities: Urban Ethnic Segregation in the Global South in the Age of Steam’
5 December (Week 11)
Room TBA,
4:30-6pm
Monica Ronchi
(Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies)
‘Settler colonialism and the representation of indigeneity: the cases of French Algeria and Israel/Palestine’

 

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Picture released in the 30s showing the minaret of a Mosque, in Damascus. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From when America needed Syria to fashion rules of the Colonial Atlantic, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Shooting Tigers in Early 20th-Century India

Bengal Tiger, Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM), Exeter.

Rajarshi Mitra
Indian Institute of Information Technology

During my trip to Exeter to attend the Britain and the World Conference earlier this year, I discovered that the Royal Bengal Tiger on display in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum (RAMM) was a gift from King George V (1865 – 1936). Exeter’s Bengal tiger was one of 39 tigers the King had killed during his hunting excursion in Nepalese Terai in 1911 – the year of his grand Coronation Durbar in India. The accompanying plaque states that the King presented tiger skins to British museums so that visitors who have never seen a tiger could meet one face-to-face. Like any responsible museum, RAMM’s curators have taken care to send a nuanced message through its natural history exhibits. They raise our environmental guilt, they remind us of nature’s destruction in the hands of man. Tiger hunts in India have a rich history of their own, and that Exeter has somehow been made part of that history had me intrigued.   Continue reading “Shooting Tigers in Early 20th-Century India”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

fake miniature
A fake miniature depicting the preparation of medicines for the treatment of a patient suffering from smallpox, purportedly from the Canon of Medicine by Avicenna (980-1037). Allegedly in the Istanbul University Library. Photo by Getty.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the global ways of white supremacy to the Stalinist Truman Show, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

The Weight of the Past in Franco-British Relations

Elizabeth Thompson’s painting “The 28th Regiment at Quatre Bras” depicts the North Gloucestershire Regiment battling French cavalry two days before the 1815 Battle of Waterloo. Rendered in 1875 it captures the power of Waterloo in British political and historical imagination.

How does one measure the influence that history has on contemporary affairs and issues? Is it possible to fashion some kind of litmus test, through which we can assess the impact that perceptions of the past have had on the conceptualisation of national and transnational policies? It is questions like these that the AHRC research project ‘The Weight of the Past in Franco-British Relations’ will explore over the next three years. Led by Professor Peter Jackson (University of Glasgow) alongside co-investigators Dr Rachel Utley (University of Leeds) and Dr Rogelia Pastor-Castro (Strathclyde University) and post-doctoral research assistant Dr Rachel Chin (University of Glasgow), this project will assess the role that representations of the past have played in Franco-British relations since 1815. More specifically, it will seek to understand how history, or at least subjective constructions of history, has shaped policy debates in general and prospects for Franco-British co-operation in particular. Continue reading “The Weight of the Past in Franco-British Relations”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

The Ryukyuan music parade or rojigaku consisted of fifteen or twenty musicians and was directed by a Japanese official called gieisei. In addition to performing when the mission reached or left an important destination, the musicians accompanied the parade of envoys along the streets of Edo, playing Chinese and Ryukyuan songs. Via Asia-Pacific Journal.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From linking the Irish Revolution and the First World War to today’s lessons from the Warsaw ghetto, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”