Exeter’s Dr. Singh Featured in BBC’s ‘Soldiers of the Empire’

Singh headshot
Dr. Gajendra Singh

BBC Radio 4 recently featured the Centre’s Dr. Gajendra Singh in its ‘Soldiers of Empire’ series, ‘The Fight for Fairyland’ (especially at 17 minutes and 26 minutes). This episode:

tells the story of the Indian Army on the Western Front, from disembarkation in Marseilles where the troops were greeted by excited crowds, to the grim reality of the trenches. Ill-equipped and inadequately trained for industrial combat, they nonetheless resolutely held one third of the British frontline between October and December 1914.

Continue reading “Exeter’s Dr. Singh Featured in BBC’s ‘Soldiers of the Empire’”

Introducing: Centre Associates

Andrew Thompson_1000785_0Andrew Thompson
Director, Centre for Imperial & Global History
University of Exeter

Though based in the Department of History, Exeter’s Centre for Imperial & Global History is very keen to reach out into other areas of the College and the wider University. We share interests with a number of colleagues based in other departments who work on aspects of the history of empires as well as different dimensions of global history. The possibilities this opens up for collaborative work, for productive exchanges across disciplines, and for supporting one another’s seminars and conferences, are striking. We have recently invited a number of such colleagues to join us as Associate Members (appended below). Many of them are already in conversation with us, and we look forward to continuing these conversations in the future and in some cases to joint projects emerging out of them. If there are other scholars who would be interested in linking with us who we have not yet made contact with, and who are not on the list below, we’d be delighted to hear from you.

Centre Associates include: Continue reading “Introducing: Centre Associates”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

seuss isolation
One of many Dr. Seuss anti-isolationist cartoons from the early 1940s. PM Magazine/Dr. Seuss

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From MI5’s Cold War obsession with historians, to the myth of American isolationism, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

15 Analyst Positions Available for Early Career UK Historians/Social Scientists

Graduate Analyst / Scientist – Ref:1429916

DepartmentDefence Science and Technology Laboratory

Deadline: 23 November 2014

Job Description: Graduate Analysts / Scientists within the area of social sciences help to deliver objective and independent scientific advice to MOD and wider Government on issues including training, equipment, personnel, information, concepts and doctrine, organisation, infrastructure, logistics, interoperability and sustainability, to inform senior decision makers’ choices on capability, balance of investment and future requirements.

Working as part of a team, you will be involved in analysing defence and security issues of a tactical, strategic or political nature applying often innovative analysis and Operational Research techniques. This may include collecting, managing and analysing data within projects, and developing bespoke tools, models and techniques to solve challenging new problems, often using a multidisciplinary approach. Depending on your area of expertise, your work may also include: developing, analysing and evaluating novel or emerging techniques; modelling and simulation and applied/fundamental research in specialist areas.

In order to fulfil these roles, Dstl employs analysts and scientists from a diverse and wide range of social science backgrounds, in order to allow for holistic analysis to be undertaken. These backgrounds include: psychology (social, forensic, cognitive and occupational), anthropology, sociology, behavioural science, human sciences, physiology, media & communication studies, marketing, journalism studies, history, criminology, management science, war studies, international relations, strategic studies, geography, political science, intelligence analysts and social network analysts. [continue reading]

For further details, click here.

Prelude to Bandung: The Interwar Origins of Anti-Colonialism

The Gathering of Visionary Anti-Imperialism. Plenary Meeting, Brussels Congress 1927. Source: Louis Gibarti (Hrsg.), Das Flammenzeichen vom Palais Egmont, Neuer Deutscher Verlag, Berlin (1927)
The Gathering of Visionary Anti-Imperialism. Plenary Meeting, Brussels Congress 1927. Source: Louis Gibarti (Hrsg.), Das Flammenzeichen vom Palais Egmont, Neuer Deutscher Verlag, Berlin (1927)

Fredrik Petersson
Åbo Akademi University
Russian State University for the Humanities (RGGU), Moscow

In 1927, the “First International Congress against Imperialism and Colonialism” convened in Brussels at Palais d’Egmont. The event celebrated the establishment of the League against Imperialism, and as the congress reached its crescendo, Willi Münzenberg, the German communist and General Secretary of International Arbeiterhilfe (IAH), declared that this was “neither the end, nor the beginning of a new powerful movement”.[1] Nearly 28 years later, amid the aftermath of the brutality of the Second World War, Münzenberg’s anti-colonial vision was revitalized at the Afro-Asian conference in Bandung, Indonesia.

In the 1955 Bandung Conference’s opening address, Achmed Sukarno, the Indonesian president, declared to the leaders of the twenty-nine countries in attendance: “I recognise that we are gathered here today as a result of sacrifices. . . . I recall in this connection the Conference of the ‘League against Imperialism and Colonialism’ which was held in Brussels almost thirty years ago.”[2] Separated by many decades and vast distance, these two events illustrate why a global history of transnational anti-colonial movements in the 20th century cannot be fixed around a particular moment in time and space – rather, it is a history enacted in radical spaces in a changing world. Continue reading “Prelude to Bandung: The Interwar Origins of Anti-Colonialism”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

influenze spreading disease

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the West’s decline to globalizing time, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Nuclear Weapons and the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 General Election

Image, adapted from Dr. Strangelove (1964).

Andrew Holt
History Department, University of Exeter

The future of Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent remains a controversial subject. Debate continues as to the nature of the replacement for the Trident force of Vanguard class submarines – or whether they should be replaced at all. Whatever their respective views, it is difficult to imagine either David Cameron or Ed Miliband choosing to put the matter at the forefront of their campaigns for the May 2015 general election. Yet 50 years ago today, that is exactly the issue upon which the prime minister chose to base his campaign. Continue reading “Nuclear Weapons and the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 General Election”