CFP: Understanding Insurgencies (1920-2000)

AMNESTY TO COUNTER INSURGENCY:

GLOBAL COMPARISONS FROM THE COLONIAL CONTEXT, 1920-2000

Workshop

Global History & Culture Centre, University of Warwick

14-15 June 2018

This workshop is part of a Leverhulme Trust Research Network on Understanding Insurgencies: Resonances from the Colonial Past.  Led by the University of Exeter’s Centre for War, State and Society, other collaborators in this international network are the University of Warwick, University of Oxford, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Paris, University of Glasgow, Universite de Québec à Montréal, and KITLV Institute Leiden. The network is funded by the Leverhulme Trust to stage a series of workshops and conferences over a three-year period, (commencing June 2016), and leading to publications.

The theme of this sixth workshop in the Understanding Insurgencies series is ‘Amnesty to Counter Insurgency’. The intention is to examine the manner in which amnesties have been used to bring about temporary cease-fires during counter-insurgency campaigns, to induce surrenders or the ending of hostilities that will bring conflict to an end, or as a means of engaging political discourse in order to generate a negotiated peace. We invite presentations that give detailed consideration to individual case studies during the twentieth century, but would also welcome papers which take a comparative approach and those that look at the principles and pit-falls that lie behind amnesty settlements, including papers that consider the political consequences of amnesties – where these may be contested as well as where they are accepted. Continue reading “CFP: Understanding Insurgencies (1920-2000)”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From when America bombs countries to save them to why the French presidential candidates are arguing about their colonial history, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

We’re Hiring! Lecturer in Digital History

Job title Lecturer in Digital History (Education & Research)

Job reference P57178

Date posted 11/04/2017

Application closing date 15/05/2017

Location Exeter

Salary The starting salary will be from £33,943 per annum within the Grade F band (£33,943 – £38,183).

Package Generous holiday allowances, flexible working, pension scheme and relocation package (if applicable).

Job category/type Academic

Job description

College of Humanities – Department of History

The University of Exeter is a Russell Group university that combines world-class research with very high levels of student satisfaction. Exeter has over 21,000 students from more than 130 different countries and is in the top 1% of universities in the world with 98% of its research rated as being of international quality. Our research focuses on some of the most fundamental issues facing humankind today.

The post of Lecturer in Digital History will contribute to extending the research profile of History at Exeter, particularly in areas related or complementary to Digital History and the Digital Humanities more generally. This permanent, full time post is available from 1st September 2017.  Continue reading “We’re Hiring! Lecturer in Digital History”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Ghana’s first post-independence president, Kwame Nkrumah, was overthrown in a US-backed military coup in 1966 [AP]

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From neocolonialism in Africa to when humanitarianism became imperialism, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Teaching and Learning War

History studies at primary school Pupils studying Second World War by reading old newspaper UK

Catriona Pennell
University of Exeter

The AHRC has recently funded the Teaching and Learning War research network, which brings together EU and international researchers and educationalists, from a range of academic disciplines and professional backgrounds (including schools, museums, archives and heritage organisations), to explore young people’s engagement with and receptivity to the cultural memory messages of the two world wars from an international comparative perspective. At the centenary of WW1 in the UK, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand young people find themselves front and centre of both state-sponsored and community-level commemorations. As the two world wars fade from living memory, young people across the Commonwealth have been singled out as those who will be carrying the memory of the war forward. Early indications suggest similar emphasis will be placed on young people in the 80th and 90thanniversaries of WW2. Continue reading “Teaching and Learning War”

Revisiting the 1917 Stockholm Peace Conference: Indian Nationalism, International Socialism, and Anti-Imperialism

Group portrait of the Dutch-Scandinavian Committee: van Kol, Troelstra, Albarda (sitting, l-r), Stauning, Branting (standing, l-r)

Ole Birk Laursen
The Open University

As we mark the centenaries of the Russian revolutions (1917) and the end of the First World War (1918), we should remember how these events are connected through the abandoned Stockholm Peace Conference and, given their anti-imperialist narratives, how they impacted the colonial world. Despite the attendance of Indians, Egyptians, Persians and Turks in Stockholm, the scant historical inquiries into this might-have-been moment tend to neglect how such anti-imperial ambitions were tied to world peace.[1] Continue reading “Revisiting the 1917 Stockholm Peace Conference: Indian Nationalism, International Socialism, and Anti-Imperialism”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From democratizing foreign policy to who is an American citizen, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”