This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

In Fusagasugá, the mural “The Embrace of Truth” memorializes those killed during the conflict. (Source: Colombia Truth Commission)

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Putin the reactionary imperialist to exaggerating the death of neoliberalism, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Protesters at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2018 © Maximiliano Ramos/ZUMA Wire/Alamy

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From erasing Hong Kong’s colonial past to Left internationalism in the heart of empire, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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Modern Transimperial and Interimperial Histories: Forms, Questions, Prospects

The Japanese Cruiser Kongo in Istanbul, 1891 by Luigi Acquarone 1800–1896

THURSDAY 12 MAY 2022 – SATURDAY 14 MAY 2022

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
Maison de la paix, chemin Eugène-Rigot 2, 1202 Genève

The Annual Pierre du Bois Conference, organized by the Graduate Institute in partnership with the Pierre du Bois Foundation, will take place at Maison de la Paix in Geneva from 12-14 May 2022. Professor Cyrus Schayegh is organizing the conference.

Louise Young, the ‘Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’ will give the Keynote Lecture titled, Now You See It, Now You Don’t: Changing Sightlines on the Japanese Empire.

Background

The scholarly context for the Pierre du Bois Annual Conference 2022 is a fascinating development in the discipline of history in the last decade: the rising interest in trans- and interimperial histories. These build on studies showing that a single empire’s metropole and colonies need to be empirically and conceptually integrated. In the first decade of the 21st century, such more contextualized and decentered histories of empire started evolving into trans- and interimperial histories proper. Inspired by an earlier turn to transnational and global histories, respective historians have been critiquing a deeply rooted and ultimately nationally-biased tendency, by many historians of empire, to focus empirical research and even conceptual conclusions on one single empire. The rise of trans- and interimperial histories crystallized by the 2010s—though it was, one may say, predated by older studies of nonEuropean modern empires. While methodologically dissimilar to present trans- and interimperial studies, these studies quasi by necessity paid considerable attention to (often unequal) relationships especially with modern European and American empires.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

A 19th-century illustration of two yellow fever victims in New Orleans Bettmann / Getty Images

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the West’s demonization of ancient Persia to how yellow fever intesified racial inequality in 19th-century New Orleans, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Map of the 1924 British Empire Exhibition at Wembley Park in London. David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From new online West African archives to the problems with the ‘balance sheet’ approach to the history of imperialism, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Ben Jones, History Today

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the race to archive Ukrainian websites to the end of globalization, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Taberna de Moe. San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico. Tamlin Magee.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From whether sanctions can stop Russia to why bootleg Moe’s Taverns are all over Latin America, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

A sign indicates the highest fire alert level. Sydney, Australia, December 2019. Photograph: David Gray/Getty Images

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From humanity’s weird history with fire to Putin’s parallels with 19th-century US imperialism, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Adolf Hitler and his army parade, Prague, March 15, 1939, the day of the invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Wehrmacht. (AFP/AFP/Getty Images)

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Russia’s long history of economic isolation to Putin’s Hitler-like tactics, a special Ukrainian edition of this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Living Timeline: Paul Robeson Mural by Art Bloc DC. Exterior wall of 1351 U Street, NW, Washington DC, June 21, 2015. Captured by Elvert Barnes Photography (Flickr)

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Paul Robeson the revolutionary to Biden’s new Cold war, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Sukarno, the first president of Indonesia. Photograph: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From racism and the history of international relations to how UK propaganda leaflets inspired the massacre of Indonesian communists, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

US General Smedley Butler. Illustration by Colin Verdi, via The New Republic.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the marine who turned against US empire to the afterlives of German colonialism in East Africa, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Dune / Production Stills / Warner Brothers Pictures

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Joseph Schumpeter and the economics of imperialism to Frank Herbert the Republican Salafist, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From the Walter Rodney murder mystery 40 years later to British collaborators in Africa, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.


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This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Alexander Palace Egg, Fabergé, 1908. Chief workmaster Henrik Wigström. © The Moscow Kremlin Museums

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From why the “Cold War” analogy today is lazy and dangerous to the ongoing hunt for the missing Fabergé Eggs, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

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