This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

The Lenin Museum, fd. in 1987. YURI LITVINENKO

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From an intimate view of the British Empire to when the Nazis were welcome in the Canary Islands, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Call for Book Reviewers – Rethinking History

William Gallois
University of Exeter

Rethinking History is seeking to attract new book reviewers and would welcome suggestions of works to review from PhD candidates and early career researchers working in global and colonial history. We also have a specific need to find reviewers for the following recently-published works: Continue reading “Call for Book Reviewers – Rethinking History”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

security guard posted during a Sept. 20 trip organized by the Saudi government to an Aramco oil-processing facility, which had been damaged nearly a week earlier in a drone and missile attack. (Amr Nabil/AP)

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From refuting the idea that precolonial Africa lacked written traditions to how war forced the United States to rethink the politics of oil, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Autumn Term @ExeterCIGH seminar schedule

The Autumn Term is now upon us, and so please find the Centre for Imperial and Global History seminar schedule below for your calendars.

Please direct any inquiries about attending to the seminar convenor, Dr Lyubi Spaskovska.

Continue reading “Autumn Term @ExeterCIGH seminar schedule”

The Habsburg Empire: A New History by Pieter Judson (2016)

Jonathan Parker
University of Texas at Austin

Cross-posted from Not Even Past

This excellent work by historian Pieter Judson shows how the Hapsburg empire was a modernizing force that sustained a complex but often mutually beneficial relationship with the various nationalist movements within its borders.  To support this argument, Judson synthesizes an impressive number of existing works on narrower topics into a cohesive narrative history of the empire from the late eighteenth century until its demise at the end of World War I. Judson claims that the empire was hardly doomed prior to 1914, arguing against long-standing nationalist histories of the empire’s inevitable collapse. While The Habsburg Empire is not without its flaws, it will surely remain required reading for anyone interested not only in the empire itself, but more broadly in the history of state-building, modernization, and nationalism in the nineteenth century. Continue reading “The Habsburg Empire: A New History by Pieter Judson (2016)”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From connecting Trump in Greenland with Germany’s Second and Third Reich to the radical right’s obsession with southern Africa, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

That Time Canada Tried to Purchase Greenland

Sir Robert Laird Borden

John C. Mitcham
Duquesne University

President Donald Trump’s recent musings about buying Greenland from Denmark stirred deep emotions abroad.  The idea of acquiring sovereign territory through a real estate purchase seems like a quintessentially American act. As a Canadian writer in the Toronto Star put it, “Whether you love him or hate him, I think we can agree on this: Donald Trump even believing he can buy Greenland is clinically insane.”

Except that Canada also once tried to purchase the Greenland.

At the height of the First World War, the leaders of the vast British Empire assembled in London to lay the foundation for a postwar world dominated by white, English-speaking peoples.  This Imperial War Conference of 1917 included representatives from the overseas Dominions of Canada, Newfoundland, South Africa, and New Zealand. It was the kind of Commonwealth gentleman’s club that would make the most romantic Brexiteers swoon with post-imperial nostalgia. Continue reading “That Time Canada Tried to Purchase Greenland”