This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Cat's Cradle

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Cat’s Cradle the TV show to the modern Left’s ‘White Man’s Burden’, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Beyond Françafrique: France Outside of its Traditional Sphere of African Influence

Beyond Françafrique:

France outside of its traditional sphere of African influence (19th-21st centuries)

Sciences Po, Paris, Centre d’Histoire, Friday 20 November 2015

The study of France’s policy in Africa has frequently focused on the interactions with its (former) Empire, the “pré-carré”. This has given rise to a narrative of uniqueness and exceptionality, whilst simultaneously contributing to critiques of France as a “neo-colonial” actor in Africa. However, a growing body of new scholarly research suggest that the time is now ripe for a reassessment of this restrictive vision.

The progressive opening up of archives in France and elsewhere, along with the expansion of global and connected histories of empire and decolonisation, has shed new light on the France’s presence in Africa in colonial and post-independence era. Continue reading “Beyond Françafrique: France Outside of its Traditional Sphere of African Influence”

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Samurai and Courtesans colour photos from 1865. Felice Beato was one of the first people to photograph the far east – and he made life bloom with colour. Here are his rare hand-coloured shots of Edo-era Japan See them at the London Photograph Fair, 23 & 24 May 2015.
Samurai and Courtesans colour photos from 1865. Felice Beato was one of the first people to photograph the far east – and he made life bloom with colour. See his rare hand-coloured shots of Edo-era Japan here and at the London Photograph Fair, 23 & 24 May 2015.

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From Disney’s fanciful film about African colonization to how the Civil War changed the world, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history. Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

Debating the British Empire: An Interview with Jeremy Black

British_Empire_1897

Richard Toye
History Department, University of Exeter

Follow on Twitter @RichardToye

Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 20.35.51How should historians tackle the controversial topic of imperialism? To what extent is it permissible to pass moral judgements on the actions of people in the past who had very different sets of values than we hold today? In his forthcoming book The British Empire: A History and A Debate, Professor Jeremy Black notes that the rights and wrongs, strengths and weaknesses of empire are a major topic in global history, and deservedly so.Focusing on the most prominent and wide-ranging empire in world history, the British empire, Black provides not only a history of that empire, but also a perspective from which to consider the issues of its strengths and weaknesses, and rights and wrongs. In short, this is history both of the past, and of the present-day discussion of the past, that recognizes that discussion over historical empires is in part a reflection of the consideration of contemporary states.

In this video, I interview Professor Black about his findings.

This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History

Rioters attack "German" shops, Crisp Street, Poplar, London, May 1915. Photograph: Alamy
Rioters attack “German” shops, Crisp Street, Poplar, London, May 1915. Photograph: Alamy

Marc-William Palen
History Department, University of Exeter
Follow on Twitter @MWPalen

From ‘Historians for Britain’ to finding MORE secret UK colonial files, here are this week’s top picks in imperial and global history.

Continue reading “This Week’s Top Picks in Imperial & Global History”

The Global Village Myth

Global Village Myth

Patrick Porter
University of Exeter

The Global Village Myth takes aim at Globalism, or the idea of the ‘death of distance’ in the world of conflict. And it takes aim at the dangerous policies it tends towards. I argue that even in a supposedly ‘globalised’ world, distance matters.

Does technology kill distance? So often we hear it. The cumulative message of our news cycle, of debate about foreign and defence policy, is the fear that the global spread of ideas, capital, weapons and people makes our world ever more dangerous. Continue reading “The Global Village Myth”

Roundtable – The Roman World and the Future of Globalisation Studies

pitts book

Exeter’s Centre for Imperial and Global History is delighted to host an interdisciplinary roundtable on Martin Pitts (University of Exeter) and Miguel John Versluys’s (Leiden University) recent edited volume, Globalisation and the Roman World (Cambridge University Press). The book makes the provocative case for understanding the ancient Roman world as one of the earliest examples of globalisation. Their study challenges that of many Roman historians and archaeologists who feel that the word globalisation is inappropriate to use when discussing the ancient world. With Pitts and Versluys’s book as a starting point, the roundtable participants – ancient historians, archaeologists, sociologists, and modern historians – will discuss how the controversial study of globalisation’s ancient origins might reshape and redirect the interdisciplinary field of globalisation studies. Chaired by Centre Director Andrew Thompson, the roundtable participants are:
  • Martin Pitts (Exeter, Classics and Ancient History)
  • Professor Elena Isayev (Exeter, Classics and Ancient History)
  • Professor David Inglis (Exeter, Sociology)
  • Robert Fletcher (Exeter, History)
  • Marc-William Palen (Exeter, History)

When: Tuesday, 26 May 2015

Time: 3-4.30pm

Where: Amory 128 (University of Exeter, Streatham Campus)